Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Almost 90 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal because the pancreas, the organ responsible for insulin production, produces insufficient amounts of the insulin and/or because the body’s tissues become resistant to normal or even high levels of insulin. The latter is known as insulin resistance.

 

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic medical condition that requires regular monitoring and treatment. Treatment includes lifestyle adjustments, self-care measures, and usually medications. Fortunately, these treatments can control blood sugar levels in the near-normal range and minimize the risk of developing diabetes-related complications.  

 

The Impact Of Type 2 Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can be a frightening and overwhelming experience, and it is common to have questions about why it developed, what it means for long-term health, and how it will affect everyday life.  It is important to try to educate yourself as soon as possible.  There is a great deal you can do as a patient to affect your diabetes.  The sooner you accept it, and care for it, the sooner it will become a part of your normal life.

In order to educate yourself, you should talk to your doctor or nurse about resources that are available for medical as well as psychological support. This may include group classes, meetings with a nutritionist, social worker, or nurse educator, and other educational resources such as books, websites, or magazines.

Despite the risks associated with type 2 diabetes, most people can lead their normal active lives. Today given all the wonderful new medications and tools at our disposal, you can live a good life with diabetes, as long as you take care of yourself.

 

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Reviewed by Dr. Mariela Glandt, Dec. 2013