#DBlogWeek Day 5 – Tips and Tricks

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My desk at work, low snack stash in the upper right hand corner.

My desk at work, low snack stash in the upper right hand corner.

This was a favorite prompt of mine from the 2014 Diabetes Blog Week, so I’m glad to see it has made a return for 2016:

“Let’s round out the week by sharing our best diabetes tips and diabetes tricks. From how you organize supplies to how you manage gear on the go/vacation (beach, or skiing, or whatever). From how you keep track of prescription numbers to how you remember to get your orders refilled. How about any “unconventional” diabetes practices, or ways to make diabetes work for YOU (not necessarily how the doctors say to do it!). There’s always something we can learn from each other. (Remember though, please no medical advice or dangerous suggestions.)”

My favorite tips and tricks usually involve ways to handle lows. I’m always on the hunt for the ideal low recovery snack (because after 18 years of glucose tablets, they get a little old). A year or two ago, I discovered that most grocery stores carry mini boxes of yogurt-covered raisins and they have become my go-to low snack.

You might be wondering what’s so special about raisins. Well, they’re perfect for lows because 1) they’re portable, 2) there are 10 carbs in one box—a good portion for when you need less than 15 grams to fix a low, and 3) they taste yummy! I keep a bunch stashed at my desk at work as well as in the pantry at home so both my T1D mom and I have easy access to them at all times.

Speaking of my desk at work, I have part of a shelf in my cubicle that functions as my designated low snack supply. I keep the aforementioned raisins, some juice boxes, and granola bars (for blood sugars in the 70s/80s) in this area, and I’ve been grateful for my advanced planning many times. After all, when you’re low at work and trying to function in between the shakes and sweats, it’s much easier to grab something to bring my sugar back up without even having to get up from my chair.

Generally speaking, dealing with diabetes in the workplace can be tricky—so it’s necessary to devise diabetes “hacks” that make it easier to manage diabetes. For instance, if my blood sugar is higher than I’d like (sometimes due to being desk-bound 9 hours a day), I seize the opportunity to both get some exercise in and lower my blood sugar without having to take extra insulin. I’ll do this by walking outside around our building, or climbing the stairs inside when the weather’s uncooperative. A mere 15 minutes of movement often does the trick for me. Plus, I know that sitting all day long is bad for me, so it’s an extra excuse to stretch my legs and do something not just good for my diabetes, but my whole body.

These are just a few of my favorite tips that work well for me and my diabetes. Remember, your diabetes may vary—your own tips and tricks might work better for you than for me!

 

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Comments (3)

  1. Kelley at

    Good tip on the raisins! I usually stock up on the “fun-size” skittles at halloween, which are 15 carbs but yeah sometimes I only need 10 to treat a low!

  2. kerri at

    yes to the walks- even 15 minutes! i agree. especially if it’s right around meal/insulin delivery time. makes a big difference! 🙂

  3. I like the idea, but hate raisins. Still I think a number of our members will love the idea.

    I referred your blog to the TUDiabetes blog page for the week of May 16, 2016.

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