#DBlogWeek Day 5 – Foods on Friday

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Foods on FridayLet me open this by saying that I love food. I enjoy buying it, preparing it, and consuming it. I wish I could spend more time exploring my creative side and trying new recipes, and I’m sure I’ll be able to do more of that in the future. Most of all, I love the social aspect of food. Each time I have dinner, I’m almost always with someone, whether it be my parents or my boyfriend or my friends. It’s always nice to sit down with people I love and eat a delicious meal together.

Those are the reasons why I’m particularly excited about today’s prompt for Diabetes Blog Week. The following is a list of what I ate on Wednesday of this week. It’s right in the middle of a typical work week for me, so I thought it would be a good example of the foods I consume on a standard day.

7:30 A.M. Breakfast: Mixed berry smoothie. I’m really into smoothies lately, likely because the weather is getting warmer and smoothies can be very refreshing. On this particular day, I took about ¾ of a cup of unsweetened vanilla almond milk and blended it with a ½ cup of frozen strawberries, a ½ cup of frozen blueberries, and a couple tablespoons of plain Greek yogurt. I also added a packet of Splenda to the mix to make it a bit sweeter. This smoothie wasn’t too bad, and it was only about 25 grams of carbohydrate. I think it would have been better if it had half a banana blended in with it; alas, we were all out in my household. Still, it was a decent way to start my Wednesday.

12:00 P.M. Lunch: Turkey and provolone cheese on a sandwich thin, a Fiber One lemon square, and an apple. The sandwich thins are usually a good option because they’re only 20 grams of carbohydrate, so you don’t wind up skimping out on bread. I really like the Fiber One squares. They come in several flavors, with lemon being my recent favorite. They’re around 18 grams of carbohydrate, but have the benefit of being light in calories without lacking in flavor. I threw an apple into the mix as well because they keep me full and because I felt like I needed some sort of fruit or vegetable at lunch. Overall, it was a higher-carb meal consisting of roughly 60 grams of carbohydrate. I went on the treadmill about an hour later to walk some of it off.

5:30 P.M. Dinner: Home-cooked sausage, mushrooms, and onions on a bulkie roll with green beans and a small serving of vanilla ice cream. Normally, I would be hesitant to have a dessert when consuming a large amount of bread, but luckily this particular roll wasn’t too heavy in carbs. In addition to hitting the spot on a lovely spring evening, it was also a satisfying meal that kept me full for hours afterward. I calculated about 60 grams of carbohydrate total in the meal and bolused accordingly. I worked some of it off by digging out our old Dance Dance Revolution mat and playing a few rounds on the Wii – you’d be surprised by how hard you wind up working when playing this game.

9:30 P.M. Snack: Most nights, I don’t seem to need a snack before I go to bed. My blood sugar was 123 mg/dL at this time, which is a pretty awesome reading. In this case, I felt like I deserved a small reward and I couldn’t resist a handful of Annie’s Cheddar Bunnies. These mini snack crackers are a lot like Goldfish, except their claim to fame is being organic. They taste wonderfully cheesy and can be addicting. I took a very small bolus to prevent going up and fell asleep about an hour later.

There you have it, a list of what I eat in an average day. After writing this, my mouth is (predictably) watering. And I still have an hour to go until lunch…

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