Increase in Diabetes and Obesity Linked to Sugary Drinks

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A new study, reported by the American Heart Association, estimates that the increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages between 1990 and 2000 contributed to 130,000 new cases of diabetes.

Sugar-sweetened soda, sport and fruit drinks (not 100 percent fruit juice) contain equivalent calories, ranging from 120 to 200 per drink, and thus play a role in the nation’s rising tide of obesity, researchers said. Previous research has linked daily consumption of these sugary beverages to an increased risk of diabetes, even apart from excessive weight gain.
The researchers, using the Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Policy Model, a well-established computer simulation model of the national population age 35 and older, estimated the additional disease caused by the drinks has increased coronary heart disease healthcare costs by 300-550 million U.S. dollars between 2000-2010. This figure likely underestimates the true costs because it does not account for the increased costs associated with the treatment and care of patients with diabetes alone.

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i thought that was common sense already?

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